Sodium chloride or heme protein induced lipid oxidation in raw, minced chicken meat and beef

https://doi.org/10.17221/182/2009-CJFSCitation:Gheisari H.R., Møller J.K.S., Adamsen C.E., Skibsted L.H. (2010): Sodium chloride or heme protein induced lipid oxidation in raw, minced chicken meat and beef. Czech J. Food Sci., 28: 364-375.
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The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the salt (NaCl) level (0%, 1% and 6%) or the addition of metmyoglobin (MetMb) in the amount twice that in the natural muscle content on the oxidative stability of minced chicken meat or beef. The minced meat samples with the added NaCl or added MetMb were stored for 3 weeks during which the analyses of TBARS, peroxide value, and volatiles coming from lipid oxidation were assessed together with the quantification of vitamin E and fatty acid profiles. Heme pigment and indices of lipid oxidation were higher for beef than for chicken, except the volatile octanal regardless of the pretreatment. Peroxide value (POV) and TBARS increased significantly over storage in both minced chicken meat and beef. The minced meat added 6% salt group had the highest contents of TBARS and POV in both species. Vitamin E values decreased significantly over storage time in chicken meat and beef. 6% salt group had the lowest vitamin E content and salt had an increasing effect on hexanal content. At the end of the storage time, 6% salt group had the highest total content of saturated and the lowest one of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Added MetMb group showed no significant differences in lipid oxidation indices in comparison with those of the control group. In conclusion, higher lipid oxidation rate and total saturated and lower polyunsaturated fatty acids were observed in the salt groups. In contrast, adding MetMb had no increasing effect on lipid oxidation in chicken meat and beef.
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