How does legacy of agriculture play role in formation of afforested soil properties?

https://doi.org/10.17221/74/2008-JFSCitation:Kacálek D., Novák J., Dušek D., Bartoš J., Černohous V. (2009): How does legacy of agriculture play role in formation of afforested soil properties? J. For. Sci., 55: 9-14.
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Soil properties of forest ecosystems depend on synergy of both parent material and organisms living in the soil, i.e. tree species communities including related plant and animal species. However these soils were not left intact being converted into agricultural land; addition of both nutrients and organic matter and cultivation using tillage led to increased fertility of topsoil. Even long-term afforested soils show differences which are considered as legacy of past agriculture. The change remains detectable for decades; though the altered properties are obvious especially couple of years after planting (approximately 10 years). We found increased concentrations of nutrients (P, K, Ca, and Mg) and subsequent increased base saturation (V %) in former tilled soil only. Moreover, there were no differences between topsoil and subsoil properties (69% and 72%, respectively). In addition to significantly lower saturation (both 0–10 cm and 11–30 cm layers) detected in the long-term-forest and 50-year-afforested (both covered with Norway spruce stands) soils in comparison with adjacent 10-year-old afforestations, there was found significantly lower base saturation in topsoil horizons compared to underlying ones.
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