Effect of soil tillage practices on severity of selected diseases in winter wheat

https://doi.org/10.17221/334/2010-PSECitation:Váňová M., Matušinsky P., Javůrek M., Vach M. (2011): Effect of soil tillage practices on severity of selected diseases in winter wheat. Plant Soil Environ., 57: 245-250.
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Soil tillage practices involving various depth, intensity, and different methods of loosening the soil and treating plant residues have changed significantly in recent years and have spread also due to technical advance. The reasons are not only in expected benefits for crop production economics but also in preserving and increasing soil fertility. Although the practices were known for decades, their greatest development and use was seen only in the last 15 years, when decreasing production costs, efficient technology and effective herbicides were the main reasons for their development. At present, they are regarded as important alternatives to conventional management practices with moldboard plowing. Minimum soil tillage practices can contribute to effective soil management, however, risks associated with using these practices in various farming conditions shall be regarded. For cereals, these risks also include disease severity that is conditioned by several circumstances, which change along with the crop management practice, variety assortment or weather in individual years. Diseases that can be of greater importance in relation to the conservation soil tillage practice are stem-base diseases, root diseases and Fusarium head blight. Our experiments did not demonstrate an increased demand for protection against Fusarium head blight, foot diseases and take-all in the given system (three-crop rotation where wheat followed white mustard). Individual years were an important factor.  
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