Soil structure and carbon distribution in subsoil affected by vegetation restoration

https://doi.org/10.17221/353/2013-PSECitation:Zhao F.Z., Han X.H., Yang G.H., Feng Y.Z., Ren G.X. (2014): Soil structure and carbon distribution in subsoil affected by vegetation restoration. Plant Soil Environ., 60: 21-26.
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The depth of sampling is an important factor for evaluating soil stability. The objective of this study was to test soil aggregate particle-size fractions and soil organic carbon (SOC) in water-stable aggregate by vegetation restoration through 0–60 cm soil profile. We collected soil samples in 30 years old Robinia psendoacacia (Rr); Platycladus orientalis (Po); Pinus tabulaeformis (Pt); abandoned land (Ab), and slope cropland (Sc), which were separated into > 2, 2–1, 1–0.25, 0.25–0.053, and < 0.053 mm fractions. The > 0.25 mm water-stable aggregates (WSA) and mean weight diameter (MWD) were calculated in 0–60 cm soil depth. Results showed that soil aggregate fractions
(> 0.25 mm) of four vegetation types were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in 40–60 cm soil depth under Po, Pt, and Ab compared with Sc and the SOC distribution in macro-aggregates (> 0.25 mm) under Rr, Po, Pt, and Ab was higher more than 37.7, 92.4, 92.5, 79.1%, respectively in 40–60 cm compared with Sc additionally, > 0.25 mm WSA and MWD was significantly higher in Pt soil in 20–40 cm, 40–60 cm soil depth (P < 0.05). The results demonstrated that soil stability was enhanced and SOC content was increased after converting slope cropland to forest, especially under Pt forest that greatly influenced the subsoil.

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