The effect of the same microbial products on basic biological activities of soil under cereal crops  

https://doi.org/10.17221/690/2016-PSECitation:Gałązka A., Gawryjołek K., Kocoń A. (2017): The effect of the same microbial products on basic biological activities of soil under cereal crops  . Plant Soil Environ., 63: 111-116.
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The aim of this research was a preliminary evaluation of the effectiveness of using three preparations which improve soil fertility and yield of plants. Field tests with microbial products: EM (effective microorganisms), EmFarma Plus and UGmax were carried out in the Agricultural Research Centre in Grabowo, Poland. The experimental plants were: spring triticale, spring barley and winter wheat. Bioproducts were applied directly into stubble or straw left in the field after harvesting grain and straw with an addition of nitrogen and were compared against control treatments, without the use of the above preparations. The implied treatments are determined for soil biological activity and the basic chemical properties of the soil. The microbiological tests showed a statistically significant difference between the control treatments and treatments with EM and UGmax preparations (a statistically significant increase in microbial biomass and activity of dehydrogenases). Analysis of principal component analysis (PCA) explained 52.54% of the variation and separated the three groups: I (UGmax), II (EM) and III (control and EmFarma Plus). It was found that the average yield of triticale grains was approximately only by 4% higher in treatments where EM and EmFarma Plus were applied, while in treatments with UGmax, triticale yielded at control level.  
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