Cadmium and zinc phytoextraction potential of seven clones of Salix spp. planted on heavy metal contaminated soils

https://doi.org/10.17221/4191-PSECitation:Vysloužilová M., Tlustoš P., Száková J. (2003): Cadmium and zinc phytoextraction potential of seven clones of Salix spp. planted on heavy metal contaminated soils. Plant Soil Environ., 49: 542-547.
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The Cd and Zn accumulation and phytoextraction potential of seven willow clones was investigated in a pot experiment for two vegetation periods. Heavily polluted Fluvisol-Litavka, moderately contaminated Cambisol-Pribram, and unpolluted control Chernozem-Suchdol were used. Significant differences were found in Cd and Zn accumulation between the willow clones. Cd and Zn were transferred from roots to aboveground tissues and all tested clones confirmed higher Cd and Zn accumulation in leaves than in twigs. Cd and Zn amounts removed by willow leaves were the highest from the most polluted soil (up to 83% Cd and 71% Zn of total removal). Therefore the harvest of leaves is necessary if willows are planted for heavy metal phytoextraction. Although the extremely high Zn contamination of Fluvisol-Litavka significantly reduced biomass production, willows planted in this soil showed the highest Zn removal because of extremely high Zn accumulation (max. 5061 ppm in leaves). Clones planted in moderately contaminated soil achieved the highest Cd removal. Clones showed different abilities to remove Cd and Zn, which was dependent on soil type and contamination level. Remediation factors were determined less than 1% for Zn in the heavily polluted soil and also unsatisfactory for Cd. However, it was shown that willows were suitable phytoextractors of moderately contaminated soil. About 20% of Cd and 4% of Zn were removed by harvested biomass from the total content of soil after two vegetation periods.
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