A challenging radiographic diagnosis – extraluminal leiomyoma of the oesophagus in a small-sized dog: a case report

https://doi.org/10.17221/230/2015-VETMEDCitation:Oh H., Kim K., Choi Y., Jung E., Jung Y., Jung J., Kim M., Kim N., Cho Y., Lee K. (2016): A challenging radiographic diagnosis – extraluminal leiomyoma of the oesophagus in a small-sized dog: a case report. Veterinarni Medicina, 61: 353-356.
download PDF
An 11-year-old, intact male Maltese dog presented with a history of vomiting and regurgitation. On plain radiographs, a caudodorsal thoracic mass was identified, and there were no radiographic signs frequently associated with an oesophageal mass. An oesophagram with fluoroscopy showed no classical signs of an oesophageal mass such as an irregular mucosal surface, a filling defect, or decreased ability of the lumen to pass contrast medium through the oesophageal lumen. A mass of pulmonary or mediastinal origin rather than of oesophageal origin was suggested. During the operation for mass removal, a gross connection between the suspected mass and the adventitia of the distal oesophagus was identified; thus, excision of the extraluminal mass was performed from the outer oesophageal wall. Histopathology confirmed the mass to be an oesophageal leiomyoma. This case highlights that the differentiation of an extraluminal oesophageal mass from other masses of mediastinal or lung origin can be challenging with radiographs and oesophagram alone. Even when the radiographic signs are not suggestive of an oesophageal mass, an extraluminal oesophageal mass should be considered.
References:
Dennis R, Kirberger RM, Barr F, Wrigley RH (2010): 8.16 Abnormalities on oesophageal contrast studies. In: Dennis R, Kirberger RM, Barr F, Wrigley RH (eds.): Handbook of Small Animal Radiology and Ultrasound. 2nd ed. Churchill Livingstone/Elsevier, London. 214–215.
 
Hardie Elizabeth M., Ramirez Oscar, Clary Erik M., Kornegay Joseph N., Correa Maria T., Feimster R. Alan, Robertson Emily R. (1998): Abnormalities of the Thoracic Bellows: Stress Fractures of the Ribs and Hiatal Hernia. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 12, 279-287  https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-1676.1998.tb02123.x
 
Higginbotham ML (2009): 20.F Esophagel tumors. In: Henry CJ, Higginbotham ML (eds.): Cancer Management in Small Animal Practice. Elsevier Health Sciences, Philadelphia. 225–227.
 
Matros L, Jergens AE, Miles KG, Kluge JP (1994): Megaesophagus and hypomotility associated with esophageal leiomyoma in a dog. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 30, 15–19.
 
North S, Banks T (2009): 15. Tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and associated structures. In: North S, Banks T (eds.): Small Animal Oncology: An Introduction. 1st ed. Elsevier Health Sciences, London. 129–143.
 
Ridgway R, Suter P (1979): Clinical and radiographic signs in primary and metastatic esophageal neoplasms of the dog. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 174, 700–704.
 
Rollois M., Ruel Y., Besso J. G. (2003): Passive liver congestion associated with caudal vena caval compression due to oesophageal leiomyoma. Journal of Small Animal Practice, 44, 460-463  https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-5827.2003.tb00106.x
 
Trumpatori BJ, White RAS (2011): 15.C Tumours of the oesophagus. In: Dobson JM, Lascelles BDX (eds.): BSAVA Manual of Canine and Feline Oncology. 3rd ed. British Small Animal Veterinary Association, Gloucester. 206–208.
 
Withrow SJ (2013): 22.C Esophageal cancer. In: Withrow SJ, Vail DM, Page R (eds.): Withrow and Macewen’s Small Animal Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Elsevier Health Sciences, Philadelphia. 399–401.
 
download PDF

© 2020 Czech Academy of Agricultural Sciences