Iodine concentrations in porcine blood, urine, and tissues after a single dose of iodised oil

https://doi.org/10.17221/7875-VETMEDCitation:Herzig I., Písaříková B., Diblíková I., Suchý P. (2001): Iodine concentrations in porcine blood, urine, and tissues after a single dose of iodised oil. Veterinarni Medicina, 46: 153-159.
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Experimental groups of pigs were treated orally with 120 mg (Group O 120), or 480 mg (Group O 480) of iodine per animal, or intramuscularly with 240 mg (Group I 240) of iodine per animal. Iodine was administered in the form of iodised fatty acid esters (IFAE). The treatment resulted in significantly increased iodine concentrations in tissues and a single dose was sufficient to meet the requirement for the whole fattening period (180 days). Urinary iodine concentrations in all the experimental groups were higher than in the control group C receiving iodine only from conventional feed. Urinary excretion of iodine between days 2 and 5 was more distinctive in orally treated than in intramuscularly treated animals (Figure 1). Iodine concentrations at the end of the fattening period (day 180) were higher in the treated than in the control groups. The treatment effect was more marked in Groups O 480 and I 240 than in Group O 120. The dynamics of blood serum iodine concentrations was similar to urinary concentrations (Figure 2). Mean thyroid gland weights in the groups O 120, O 480, I 240, and C were 9.19, 8.51, 7.10, and 12.01 g, respectively. An opposite tendency was observed for iodine concentrations in thyroid gland dry matter (Figure 3). No effects of any of the treatments on total protein, albumin, total lipids, or cholesterol concentrations in blood serum were observed. Group C showed lower tissue iodine concentrations than any of the experimental groups. The only exception was hepatic tissue in which approximately the same iodine concentrations were found in all the groups. Data obtained in Groups O 120, O 480, and I 240 indicate that decisive for tissue concentrations was rather the dose of iodine than the route of administration. Iodine is stored above all in the thyroid gland and adipose tissue. As can be seen in Figure 4, its concentration was higher in muscles with a higher proportion of fat (neck) than in lean muscles (ham).
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