Veterinary meat inspection of pig carcasses in the Czech Republic during the period of 1995–2002

https://doi.org/10.17221/5771-VETMEDCitation:Kozak A., Vecerek V., Chloupek P., Tremlova B., Malena M. (2003): Veterinary meat inspection of pig carcasses in the Czech Republic during the period of 1995–2002. Veterinarni Medicina, 48: 207-214.
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The results of meat inspection classification of pig carcasses reflect long-term aspects of health status in pig production farms and the quality of transport and handling of animals at slaughterhouses. Veterinary inspec­tors recorded the data obtained from meat inspection classification of 36 028 821 pig carcasses at slaughterhouses in theCzechRepublicduring the period of 1995–2002 together with the reasons for classification. The trends were evaluated by a comparison of two periods (Period I: 1995–1998; Period II: 1999–2002) by means of calculating the indexes of values from Period II compared to those of Period I. Pig carcasses classified as capable for human con­sumption (edible) were found in 97.28% of cases (97.26% during Period I and 97.31% during Period II, index 1.00), while those classified as capable for processing (conditionally edible) were found in 2.15% of cases (2.28% during Period I and 2.02% during Period II, index 0.89), and those condemned in 0.57% of cases (0.47% during Period I and 0.67% during Period II, index 1.43). The reasons for classifying the carcasses as condemned were as follows: sensorial changes in meat – 0.33% (0.26% during Period I and 0.41% during Period II, index 1.56), lesions due to non-infec­tious diseases – 0.12% (0.12% during Period I and 0.12% during Period II, index 0.97), added deleterious substances – 0.05% (0.03% during Period I and 0.07% during Period II, index 2.50), lesions due to respiratory infections – 0.03% (0.03% during Period I and 0.04% during Period II, index 1.70), boar taint – 0.02% (0.02% during Period I and 0.03% during Period II, index 1.36). Other reasons to condemn the carcasses included tuberculous lesions, lesions due to miscellaneous infections, digestive infections, parasitic diseases, and Salmonella infections. The occurrence of these conditions was on the level of mere hundredths of per cent. No case of Aujeszky’s disease was found. According to the results of meat inspection classification, the risk of food-borne diseases originating from pig carcasses tends to be greater in the lesions due to non-infectious conditions with a long-term increasing trend. A considerable increase in the numbers of pig carcasses condemned due to added deleterious substances (index 2.50) is an alarming finding with regard to potential food safety hazards.
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