Impact of long-term supplementation of zinc and selenium on their content in blood and hair in goats

https://doi.org/10.17221/1581-VETMEDCitation:Pavlata L., Chomat M., Pechova A., Misurova L., Dvorak R. (2011): Impact of long-term supplementation of zinc and selenium on their content in blood and hair in goats. Veterinarni Medicina, 56: 63-74.
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This paper evaluates the impact of long-term supplementation of different forms of zinc (Zn) and selenium (Se) on the content of these substances in the blood and hair of goats. Two analogous supplementation experiments were performed. 37 goats divided into four groups were used in the first trial with the Zn supplementation. Group A (n = 10) was a control group (with no Zn administered). A further three groups (B, C, D) were supplemented with Zn in various forms. Group B (n = 9) with zinc oxide, Group C (n = 9) with zinc lactate and Group D (n = 9) with zinc chelate. The second trial with Se supplementation was carried out on 20 goats divided into four groups. Group E (n = 5) was a control group. The other three groups were administered Se. Group F (n = 5) was supplied with a selenium lactate-protein complex, Group G (n = 5) with sodium selenite and Group H (n = 5) with selenium yeast. Three months later blood and hair samples were taken from all animals and Zn and Se concentrations were determined in whole blood, plasma, and hair. Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity was determined in the Se supplementation trial group. At the end of the trial the Zn concentrations in plasma and whole blood were without major differences between the groups. The plasma concentration of Zn did not increase from the initial value at the start of the trial. In hair the average concentration of Zn was 95.2–100.0 mg/kg
in all groups. No conclusive relation was confirmed between the values of Zn in hair and its concentration in blood. The Se concentration in whole blood (µg/l) at the end of trial in supplemented groups (F – 188.8 ± 24.6; G – 197.2 ± 10.9; H – 190.1 ± 26.3) was significantly higher (P < 0.01) than in the control group (E – 103.1 ± 23.5). Similarly, the activity of GSH-Px (µkat/l) was significantly higher in all supplemented groups (F – 872.3 ± 94.8; G – 659.5 ± 176.4; H – 839.8 ± 150.8) than in the control group (E – 379.1 ± 63.5). Se content in hair (µg/kg) was higher also in all trial groups (F – 242.3 ± 41.5; G – 200.5 ± 46.9; H – 270.0 ± 106.8) than in the control group (E – 174.7 ± 38.0). However, it was significantly (P < 0.05) higher only in Group F. A conclusive correlation was identified between the Se concentration in whole blood and its content in hair (r = 0.54; P < 0.05; n = 20). Based on the results it can be concluded that none of the supplemented forms of Zn increased its concentration in blood, plasma and hair. On the other hand, the administration of Se led to an increase in the Se concentration in blood, increased the activity of GSH-Px in whole blood and the Se content in hair. Based on the proven correlation and regression relation between the Se concentration in blood and its content in hair, hair can be considered as a suitable material for the diagnosis of long-term Se status in goats. Goats with sufficient Se status are those that have more than 160 µg/kg of Se in hair dry weight.
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